Barcode death knell sounding

Increased demand from Kiwis on the products they purchase could spell the end of the barcode, the blocks of black and white stripes that adorn most objects for sale and are scanned five billion times a day. While allowing cashiers to ring up products more quickly, barcodes also streamline logistics. But in the wake of shoppers demanding far greater transparency about products and store owners needing more information to help with stock taking, product recalls and to fight fakes, the basic barcod

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