Here today, gone tomorrow

Screen Shot 2015-01-28 at 2.48.45 pm pop upYou only need to look at the rest of the world to predict what is going to happen locally. I know this is a fierce generalisation, particularly when it comes to some subjects, but as I am talking about pop ups – I can tell you, they are here to stay.

The world is rapidly changing, we can communicate easily and quickly, products and services are fast adapting to the needs of convenience demanded by the consumer. Retail is now available 24-7 through the internet, we can shop whenever we want. Before pop ups, the bricks and mortar retail solution required businesses to sign long term leases with high risk potential, especially if it was a new business.

Not any more – pop ups allow online businesses to trial bricks and mortar or an established business can try a new location with a view to testing the market.

Pops ups have also become an integral component to the omni-channel strategy, allowing businesses to trial locations or even be present in areas where they would not consider a long term lease. Pop ups also allow e-tailers to connect with people in a way they haven’t before.

Seasonal retail stores can also benefit from pop ups. Think of retailers who have a robust four months in summer, but are dead during the winter months. The solution would be to have a pop up store during summer and focus on online during the quieter months.

Retailers are rethinking marketing strategies and finding alternative ways to create a brand lifestyle and build customer relationships. Pop ups are a great way of utilising marketing budgets and getting face time with customers. This concept is great for faster exposure to test market new products, market research, or even building customer loyalty promotions.

We’re seeing more and more genius and creative pop ups – McDonald’s constructed a giant lunchbox in Sydney, Penguin is selling its books at a traditional cart-style stall, and Kate Spade is launching new ranges in food-style trucks.

When in London last year, the Pop Up Now by Spaceworks team managed to visit the Marc Jacobs Pop Up Tweet Shop, where customers could snag fragrance samples and products in exchange for posting to Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram. Kelloggs hosted a similar pop up experience in 2012 in London. Other uses include educational components for beauty or technology brands looking to demonstrate a product or process that may not transpire online.


As a nation of entrepreneurs, imaginative, and resourceful people, I implore you all to think outside of the retail box and give pop up amazingness a whirl.

Pop ups are an exciting concept and are definitely here to stay. Businesses can create a mark and stand out from the crowd by creating memorable experiences.

Lizzi Hines is MD of Spaceworks Design Group, and can be contacted on 0800 2 FIT OUT. Click here for more information on Pop Up Now or phone 0800 POP UPS.

 

 

 

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